You’ll either love or hate this rendering…


For many, The Dukes of Hazzard is a borderline sacred TV show from back before everyone started getting overly sensitive. The various episodes aren’t intellectually deep and that’s the point: it’s just some good ol’ boys having some fun with you along for the ride. Those overwhelmingly positive feelings are closely associated with everyone’s favorite Dodge Charger, the General Lee. This is why messing with the beloved television car is a bold and maybe ultimately stupid move, depending on your viewpoint.

image credit: Instagram

Kalim Oozeear dropped two posts on his Instagram account to show off how he would reimagine the General Lee. The designer used his pixel painting skills not to remove the flag from the roof to make the Dukes of Hazzard muscle car “safe” for everyone, but instead to heavily modify the thing using modern sensibilities.

Well, we should say not everyone likes the look of a widebody, bagged American muscle car, but there are plenty who do. Turbochargers are still pretty controversial in some groups since certain individuals believe a “true” muscle car is all-motor or maybe has a supercharger, but no snail power added.

image credit: Instagram

One of the first things you notice are the two turbochargers rising out of the hood like some sort of alien eyes. It’s not the same effect as a big blower on Dominic’s Charger. Those big fender flares and massive wheels with low-profile tires wrapped around also greatly change the look of the General Lee. More subtle is the black front splitter which along with most of the other modifications would make jumping the car catastrophic. What is the General Lee to do if it’s not jumping a river or Boss Hog’s Cadillac?

It seems Kalim Oozeear didn’t know too much about the cultural aspects around the General Lee since he made a western reference in one of his posts, so he might’ve been surprised by the many negative comments mixed in with the positive ones on the second post. It seems like most were just happy with the first rendering because it prominently displayed the Confederate flag on the roof.