Getting it out was apparently an afterthought.


We’ve all been there, lusting after some crazy European supercar we could never afford because it costs more than our house. While some put up a poster or buy a model car to kind of satisfy that desire, others roll up their sleeves and build a replica. We’ve seen some pretty hideous attempts at converting a regular car into a supercar, but this one is different. A man took 17 years to construct a Lamborghini Countach 5000 S in his basement and it doesn’t look like it melted in the sun. instead, he pretty much nailed the car. However, getting it out of the basement required some ingenuity.

Never underestimate the power of a beautiful car. While some like Chip Foose find the production LamborghiniCountach to be too busy and ugly, others have dreamed of owning one from the time they first beheld the Italian supercar. It seems Ken Imhoff is a dedicated admirer of the Countach since he dedicated close to two decades of his life crafting one by hand.

image credit: YouTube

Imhoff first saw the Lambo in the movie Cannonball Run and instantly was mesmerized by it. While the man couldn’t afford to buy one, he decided he could do the next best thing. To create the Countach, he first constructed a wood frame, then shaped aluminum body panels on an English wheel. Some Lamborghini parts are included, but the engine is a Ford V8.

This amazing project spanned from 1990 to 2007. Seeing it through to completion is serious dedication, because a lot of people would’ve just given up at some point.

After completing his amazing supercar, Imhoff faced a challenge perhaps he hadn’t thought of before: getting it out of his basement. That required digging a hole, knocking out part of his basement wall, then dragging the Lambo out on a sled. Yes, it would’ve been wise to build the vehicle in his garage, but for reasons we don’t know he used his basement as the workshop.

Ultimately, Imhoff sold his replica Lamborghini Countach. He said he didn’t care enough about maintaining the vehicle to keep it. While you might think he’s crazy for getting rid of something he spent so long crafting, know that during this project the man struggled with depression, health problems, alcohol, money issues, and being separated from his wife. He couldn’t just enjoy the supercar since it was a reminder of that dark time in his life, so in a way for him it was therapeutic to sell it.