This classic wedge-shaped design was originally intended to reach 200 miles per hour. A restoration company intends to finally get it there, 40 years later.


Back in 1980, the wedge styling of the Aston Martin Bulldog concept car was revolutionary, offering a look at what the future may be for the British sports car maker. Originally, the company planned to build somewhere between 15 and 25 bulldogs. Unfortunately, just one would be produced.

The Bulldog proved to be far too expensive to build, and the sole example began a globe-trotting journey that spanned decades starting in 1984, where it was sold to a collector in the Middle East.

Image Via Classic Motor Cars Ltd/Facebook

The car's first owner added rear view mirrors before selling it to an American collector, who would later sell it to someone in Asia. Eventually, it ended up back in American hands.

At some point, the Bulldog was repainted and reupholstered – originally, it was a two-tone silver/grey with a deep brown interior. We find the Bulldog's current color palate to be quite handsome.

Image Via Classic Motor Cars Ltd/Facebook

Now, according to Robb Report, the once-mighty Bulldog is under restoration by Classic Motors Cars, a restoration facility in Shropshire, England. The restoration is expected to take eighteen months.

Due to the car's advanced (for its day) electronics and one-off status, the restoration will be a challenge. However, Classic Motor Cars intends to do more than just make the Bulldog pretty again. They're going to make it fully operational.

Image Via Classic Motor Cars Ltd/Facebook

One of the Bulldog's original design goals was 200 miles per hour – quite a lofty claim in 1980, and still quite respectable four decades later. In all reality, the Bulldog's 5.3 liter twin-turbocharged V8 was able to push the aerodynamic bulldog to an impressive 191 miles per hour when it was new.

As part of the restoration, Classic Motor Cars will finally see to it that the Bulldog reaches 200 miles per hour. It would be an impressive feat for sure, and we hope they're successful.