This design is a mashup of American and Japanese sensibilities.


We here at Motorious are well aware of how popular the Plymouth ‘Cuda is among fans of classic muscle cars, as well as the Mopar faithful. We also understand everyone might not be a fan of this rendering posted on Instagram by Sad Machines. The knee-jerk reaction might be disgust at the modifications to such a beautiful, unique, and timeless design beloved by many.

Image source: Instagram

This rendering incorporates elements from some Japanese classics as well as some of the design sensibilities prominent in the island nation, hence why Sad Machines calls it an All American Kaido Racer. It’s an interesting mix of American and Japanese car culture. There are headlights from a TA40 Toyota Celica, taillights from a C210 Nissan Skyline, custom TRD Tosco wheels, and of course the towering Takeyari pipes towering out the of the rear like the spears of an invading foreign army.

Image source: Instagram

As you look more closely, this ‘Cuda has some pretty large fender flares and a pretty large whale tail with a wing. Then there’s the externally-mounted front intercooler, something which is questionable in both its aesthetics and practicality.

Image source: Instagram

Of course, one of the other details which really jumps out at you is the Japanese characters on the top of the windshield, making it obvious to just about anyone the origin of the crazy design.

Image source: Instagram

Even with all the Japanese car culture elements present on this Plymouth, you might recognize the livery as being inspired by Dan Gurney’s #42 Plymouth AAR ‘Cuda which terrorized the competition in Trans-Am racing. It’s a nice call-out and shows Sad Machines understands a thing or two about Mopar heritage.

It’s expected that a fair amount of our readers won’t like this rendering at all, and that’s ok. We’re not entirely sure about it ourselves, but thought it interesting enough to post for everyone to see. If nothing else this car is unique, although actually doing this to a ’70 Plymouth ‘Cuda could spark some serious outrage.