1974 Porsche 911

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Overview


The model year 1974 saw three significant changes.



Several models of the 911 were made in 1974 and changes occurred in most of them.

911 Carrera RS

In 1974, Porsche created the Carrera RS 3.0 with mechanical fuel injection. Its price was almost twice that of the 2.7 RS, but it offered a fair amount of racing capability for the money. The chassis was largely similar to that of the 1973 Carrera RSR and the brake system was from the Porsche 917. The use of thin metal plate panels and a Spartan interior enabled the shipping weight to be reduced to around 1984 lb.

The Carrera RSR 3.0 was sold to racing teams, and scored outright wins in several major sports car races of the mid-1970s. Also, a prototype Carrera RSR Turbo (with 2.1 L engine due to a 1.4x equivalency formula) came second at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1974 and won several major races, a significant event in that its engine would form the basis of many future Porsche attempts in sports car racing. Save for the earlier Porsche 917, it can be regarded as Porsche's start of its commitment to turbocharging also in road cars.

911 and 911S 2.7

The model year 1974 saw three significant changes. First, the engine size was increased to 2687 cc giving an increase in torque. Second, was the introduction of impact bumpers to conform with low-speed protection requirements of US law, these bumpers being so successfully integrated into the design that they remained unchanged for 15 years. Thirdly, the use of K-Jetronic CIS Bosch fuel injection in two of the three models in the line up— the 911 and 911S models, retaining the narrow rear arches of the old 2.4, now had a 2.7-liter engine producing 150 hp and 173 hp, respectively.

911 Carrera 2.7

The 2.7 Carrera built for all markets, except for the United States, used the 210 hp RS 911/83 engine with Bosch (Kugelfischer) MFI from the 1973 Carrera RS.
These 2.7 Carrera MFI models were built from 1974 until 1976 and were mechanically identical to the 1973 Carrera RS and had the same rear widened arches. The coupe weighed in at 1075 kg, the same as the 1973 Carrera RS Touring. The Carrera built for the US market was powered by the same 2.7 liter engine as the 911S which produced 173 hp.

For the 1974 model year the Carrera was available with the ducktail from the 1973 Carrera RS except for the German market. In the US market the ducktail was standard on the Carrera.

In autumn the first Porsche Turbo code-named the 930 (2994 cc, 260 hp) sees the light of day, providing the foundation for various racing models code-named the 935 in the years to follow, with maximum output up to 850 hp.

The body shape is distinctive thanks to wide wheel-arches to accommodate the wide tires, and a large rear spoiler often known as a “whale tail" or “ducktail” on the early cars, and "tea-tray" on the later ones. Starting out with a 3.0 L engine 260 hp, these early cars are known for their exhilarating acceleration coupled with challenging handling characteristics and extreme turbo lag.

Production Numbers


911 11,733
Total Production 11,733

Performance Specs


Engine Size Carb. HP Torque 0 to 60 Quarter mile
911 2.7L F/I 143 at 6000 rpm 168 lb-ft at 3800 8.5 15.4
911S & Carrera 2.7L F/I 167 at 2000 rpm 168 lb-ft at 4000 7.6 sec 14.5 sec
911 Turbo 3.0L F/I 260 at 5000 rpm 253 lb-ft at 4000 - -

Transmission


  • 5-Speed Manual
  • Special Order Automatic

Paint & Colors


Exterior

Light Ivory
Tangerine
Kelly Green
Light Yellow
Signal Yellow
Sepia Brown
Aubergine
Bahia Red
Dalmation Blue
Blue
Gemini Blue
Silver
Raspberry
Gold

Interior

Black
Brown
Biege

OEM Brochures

About the Knowledge Base


The Motorious Knowledge Base provides a comprehensive vehicle overview for the 1974 Porsche 911 including production numbers, performance specs, factory colors, and OEM brochures. Check out additional model years or related content linked to this article or view other Makes and Models in our Research center.

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