Porsche

vehicle-make
1974 Porsche 911

1974 Porsche 911

members 3 min read
In 1974, Porsche created the Carrera RS 3.0 with mechanical fuel injection. Its price was almost twice that of the 2.7 RS, but it offered a fair amount of racing capability for the money. The chassis was largely similar to that of the 1973 Carrera RSR and the brake system was from the Porsche 917.
1971 Porsche 911

1971 Porsche 911

members 3 min read
The 1970 Porsche 911 was so good that the 1971 model year was basically unchanged. In 1971, the D-series replaced the C-series. The D-series featured galvanized under floor areas that were coated with PVC to make the car more resistant to corrosion.
1976 Porsche 911

1976 Porsche 911

members 3 min read
In 1976 Porsche still made the 911 S Targa, the 911 S Coupe and the 911 E with few changes. However, Porsche headlined the mightiest 911 yet, the Turbo Carrera. They advertised it as “The Ultimate Porsche” and so it was.
1969 Porsche 911

1969 Porsche 911

members 2 min read
In 1969 The wheelbase for all 911 and 912 models increased from 87.0 to 89.3 in, this helped the handing of the 911 when drivers would drive at the 911's limit creating more confidence between driver and car.
1975 Porsche 911

1975 Porsche 911

members 2 min read
The 1975 Porsche 911 Turbo was a 2 door coupe-bodied car with a rear mounted engine supplying power to the rear wheels. It was powered by a dry sump turbocharged engine of 3 liters capacity. It featured single overhead camshaft valve gear, 6 cylinder layout, and 2 valves per cylinder.
1967 Porsche 911

1967 Porsche 911

members 3 min read
The 1967 911 saw its first major change with the introduction of the semi-open "Targa" model, which in addition to a lift-off roof came initially with a soft, folding rear window. Many ended up being replaced with glass windows, therefore the "soft" Targas are quite rare and valuable today.
1965 Porsche 911

1965 Porsche 911

members 3 min read
The new 2.0 was engineered with overhead camshafts in place of the dated pushrods, and could accomodate future displacement increases all the way up to 3.6 liters, and could even be turbocharged for production and racing purposes.
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